Press Release

Monday
Aug012011

Children’s Book Helps Breastfeeding Moms Save $1,500

CHICAGO—August 1, 2011   Commonly, when a mother leaves the hospital with her new baby, she is given samples of infant formula and coupons from the manufacturer.  “What they really should be providing her with is a calculator,” says Mark Repkin, author of children’s book “Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother.” 

“$1,500!  That’s approximately what the family that bottle feeds will be spending the first year for the cost of basic formula,” Repkin continues.

“If the health benefits of breastfeeding aren’t enough of a reason to choose breastfeeding vs. the bottle, perhaps the pocketbook is,” says Repkin.  “With the bleak outlook for the U.S. dollar, mothers who are bottle feeding are likely to shell out more money for infant feeding formula than ever before.”

Coinciding with World Breastfeeding Week (August 1-7), the publisher of “Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother/ Mamà Amananta A Mi Hermanito” announced that the teach-your-child book will be available in a bilingual (English/Spanish) version later this month.  The children’s book is written for the age range of 2-6 years.

“Gaining the support of the family, including the new baby’s sibling, is one of the most practical breastfeeding tips I can suggest,” adds Repkin.  “I love hearing from Mothers who share how they use the book to explain breastfeeding to their child. If in any way the book helped them avoid the costly choice of formula, I am thrilled.”  

“Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother” is a charming, thoughtful portrayal of how a family adjusts to life with an “ever-hungry” infant and an inquisitive two-year-old sibling.  The sweetly illustrated children’s book relates the perplexing, often amusing situations that arise when Mommy is feeding the baby.

“The author does a wonderful job assisting siblings in an age-appropriate understanding of breastfeeding as well as guiding the adjustment to her new sibling role,” said Dr. Susan Sirota, pediatric instructor at Northwestern University Medical School.

“Parents want to know how to introduce these concepts to older siblings, and “Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother” provides ideas that worked… ,” said Marian Tompson, co-founder of La Leche League International.

 Research shows that antibodies passed from a nursing mother to her baby can help lower the occurrence of many conditions, including ear infections, diarrhea, respiratory infections, and meningitis.  “Financially speaking, breastfeeding mothers may be able to reduce some of the hidden costs of unplanned doctor visits which can quickly add up during the first year,” says Repkin.

Repkin adds, “I’m excited that the bilingual version of “Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother” will reach both the English and Spanish speaking mothers, and serve as a tool to teach their new baby’s siblings the importance of breastfeeding.  Mother’s who breastfeed make both a natural healthy decision and a financially smart choice.”

Sunday
Aug162009

What’s Mommy Doing?! Happily Breastfeeding @ the Gen-X Family Table

More than 7 out of 10 moms are doing what comes naturally and foregoing the bottle for the breast, according to the CDC. To an older sibling, however, breastfeeding is anything but a natural event. It’s less time with Mommy. It’s frustrating, annoying and really confusing. And what’s wrong with the sippy cup anyway? Written to restore harmony through understanding, Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother is a new children’s book that will be treasured by today’s young families.

Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother is a charming, thoughtful portrayal of how a family adjusts to life with an “ever-hungry” infant and an inquisitive two-year-old sibling. Based on personal experiences of author Mark Repkin and his wife Stacy, the sweetly illustrated children’s book relates the perplexing, often amusing situations that arise when Mommy is feeding baby. Pro-breastfeeding families will appreciate the creative ways used to resolve the discord.

“We’ve come a long way with appreciating the importance of breastfeeding,” said Marian Tompson, co-founder of La Leche League International. “Parents want to know how to introduce these concepts to older siblings, and Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother provides ideas that worked… .”

Throughout the first half of the book, big sister Jenna finds herself dealing with a range of fresh emotions, from natural curiosity, to green-eyed jealousy, to the insecurity of being “dethroned.” In the end, however, love and ingenuity enable Jenna to understand the importance of nursing and become an adoring sister to baby Spencer and a super helper to Mom and Dad.

“This delightful book is a great addition to a child’s library. The author does a wonderful job assisting siblings in an age-appropriate understanding of breastfeeding as well as guiding the adjustment to her new sibling role,” said Dr. Susan Sirota, private practitioner and pediatric instructor at Northwestern University Medical School. “This book fills a need which has long been unmet for parents. I look forward to recommending it to families in my practice.”

Although 77 percent of moms nationally start to breastfeed, the figure drops dramatically to 36 percent by the time babies reach six months of age, according to a new Brigham Young University study. The American Association of Pediatricians recommends continued breastfeeding through baby’s first year. So why do moms stop nursing? Among the top reasons is the pressure placed on the mother from friends, peers, and family. Mommy Breastfeeds My Baby Brother is definitely doing its part to address the latter.